Project Team Regal

Members
Overall Objectives
Scientific Foundations
Application Domains
Software
New Results
Partnerships and Cooperations
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Section: Partnerships and Cooperations

National initiatives

ODISEA2 - (2011–2014)

Members:

Orange, LIP6 (Regal), UbiStorage, Technicolor, Institut Telecom

Funding:

FUI project, Ile de France Region

Objectives:

ODISEA aims at designing new on-line data storage and data sharing solutions. Current solutions rely on big data centers, which induce many drawbacks: (i) a high cost, (ii) proprietary solutions, (iii) inefficiency (one single location, not necessarily close to the user). The goal is to tackle these issues by designing a distributed/decentralized solution that leverage edge resources like set-top boxes.

It involves a grant of 159 000 euros from Region Ile de France over three years.

MyCloud - (2011–2014)

Members:

INRIA Rhones-Alpes (SARDES), LIP6 (REGAL), EMN, WeAreCloud, Elastic Cloud

Funding:

MyCloud project is funded by ANR Arpège

Objectives:

Cloud Computing is a paradigm for enabling remote, on-demand access to a set of configurable computing resources. The objective of the MyCloud project is to define and implement a novel cloud model: SLAaaS (SLA aware Service). Novel models, control laws, distributed algorithms and languages will be proposed for automated provisioning, configuration and deployment of cloud services to meet SLA requirements, while tackling scalability and dynamics issues. The principal investigators for Regal are Luciana Arantes, Pierre Sens, and Julien Sopena. It involves a grant of 155 000 euros from ANR to LIP6 over three years.

ConcoRDanT - (2010–2013)

Members:

INRIA Regal, project leader; LORIA, Universdide Nova de Lisboa

Funding:

PROSE project is funded by ANR Blanc

Objectives:

CRDTs for consistency without concurrency control in Cloud and Peer-To-Peer systems Massive computing systems and their applications suffer from a fundamental tension between scalability and data consistency. Avoiding the synchronisation bottleneck requires highly skilled programmers, makes applications complex and brittle, and is error-prone. The ConcoRDanT project investigates a promising new approach that is simple, scales indefinitely, and provably ensures eventual consistency. A Commutative Replicated Data Type (CRDT) is a data type where all concurrent operations commute. If all replicas execute all operations, they converge; no complex concurrency control is required. We have shown in the past that CRDTs can replace existing techniques in a number of tasks where distributed users can update concurrently, such as co-operative editing, wikis, and version control. However CRDTs are not a universal solution and raise their own issues (e.g., growth of meta-data). The ConcoRDanT project engages in a systematic and principled study of CRDTs, to discover their power and limitations, both theoretical and practical. Its outcome will be a body of knowledge about CRDTs and a library of CRDT designs, and applications using them. We are hopeful that significant distributed applications can be designed using CRDTs, a radical simplification of software, elegantly reconciling scalability and consistency. The project leader and principal investigator for Regal is Marc Shapiro. ConcoRDanT involves a grant of 192 637 euros from ANR to INRIA over three years.

STREAMS - (2010–2013)

Members:

LORIA (Score, Cassis), INRIA (Regal, ASAP), Xwiki

Funding:

STREAMS is funded by ANR Arpège

Objectives:

Solutions for a peer-To-peer REAl-tiMe Social web The STREAMS project proposes to design peer-to-peer solutions that offer underlying services required by real-time social web applications and that eliminate the disadvantages of centralised architectures. These solutions are meant to replace a central authority-based collaboration with a distributed collaboration that offers support for decentralisation of services. The project aims to advance the state of the art on peer-to-peer networks for social and real-time applications. Scalability is generally considered as an inherent characteristic of peer-to-peer systems. It is traditionally achieved using replication techniques. Unfortunately, the current state of the art in peer-to-peer networks does not address replication of continuously updated content due to real-time user changes. Moreover, there exists a tension between sharing data with friends in a social network deployed in an open peer-to-peer network and ensuring privacy. One of the most challenging issues in social applications is how to balance collaboration with access control to shared objects. Interaction is aimed at making shared objects available to all who need them, whereas access control seeks to ensure this availability only to users with proper authorisation. STREAMS project aims at providing theoretical solutions to these challenges as well as practical experimentation. The principal investigators for Regal is Marc Shapiro. It involves a grant of 57 000 euros from ANR to INRIA over three years.

PROSE - (2009–2011)

Members:

Technicolor, INRIA (Regal), EURECOM, PLAYADZ, LIAFA

Funding:

PROSE project is funded by ANR VERSO

Objectives:

Content Shared Through Peer-to-Peer Recommendation & Opportunistic Social Environment

The Prose project is a collective effort to design opportunistic contact sharing schemes, and characterizes the environmental conditions as well as algorithmic and architecture principles that let them operate. The partners of the Prose project will engage in this exploration through various expertise: network measurement, system design, behavioral study, analysis of distributed algorithms, theory of dynamic graph, networking modeling, and performance evaluation.

The principal investigators for Regal are Sébastien Monnet and Marc Shapiro. It involves a grant of 152 000 euros from ANR to INRIA over three years.

ABL - (2009–2012)

Members:

Gilles Muller, Gaël Thomas, Julia Lawall, Saha Suman

Funding:

ANR Blanc

Objectives:

The goal of the “A Bug's Life” (ABL) project is to develop a comprehensive solution to the problem of finding bugs in API usage in open source infrastructure software. The ABL project has grown out of our experience in using the Coccinelle code matching and transformation tool, which we have developed as part of the former ANR project Blanc Coccinelle, and our interactions with the Linux community. Coccinelle targets the problem of documenting and automating collateral evolutions in C code, specifically Linux code. A collateral evolution is a change that is needed in the clients of an API when the API changes in some way that affects its interface. Coccinelle provides a language for expressing collateral evolutions by means of Semantic Patches, and a transformation tool for performing them automatically.

We have used Coccinelle to reproduce over 60 collateral evolutions in recent versions of Linux, affecting almost 6000 files. Recently, we have begun using Coccinelle to generate traditional patches for improving the safety of Linux. Over 800 of these patches developed using Coccinelle have been integrated into the mainline Linux kernel. Julia Lawall was among the top 10 in terms of the number of contributed patches in Linux 2.6.36. Finally, about 20 semantic patches are integrated into the Linux sources so that developpers can improve the quality of their programs by running Coccinelle as part of the development process.

In the ABL project, we are building on the results of Coccinelle by 1) designing libraries of semantic patches to identify API protocols and detect violations in their usage, 2) extending Coccinelle to address the needs of bug finding and reporting, and 3) designing complementary tools to help the programmer to track and fix bugs.

SHAMAN - (2009–2011)

Members:

LIP6 (NPA), Inria Saclay (Grand-Large), Inria Bretagne (ASAP), LIP6 (Regal)

Funding:

SHAMAN project is funded by ANR TELECOM

Objectives:

Large-scale networks (e.g. sensor networks, peer-to-peer networks) typically include several thousands (or even hundred thousand) basic elements (computers, processors) endowed with communication capabilities (low power radio, dedicated fast network, Internet). Because of the large number of involved components, these systems are particularly vulnerable to occurrences of failures or attacks (permanent, transient, intermittent). Our focus in this project is to enable the sustainability of autonomous network functionalities in spite of component failures (lack of power, physical damage, software or environmental interference, etc.) or system evolution (changes in topology, alteration of needs or capacities). We emphasize the self-organization, fault-tolerance, and resource saving properties of the potential solutions. In this project, we will consider two different kinds of large-scale systems: on one hand sensor networks, and on the other hand peer to peer networks.

R-DISCOVER - (2009–2011)

Members:

MIS, LASMEA, GREYC, LIP6 (Regal), Thales

Funding:

R-DISCOVER project is funded by ANR CONTINT

Objectives:

This project considers a set of sensors and mobile robots arbitrarily deployed in a geographical area. Sensors are static. The robots can move and observe the positions of other robots and sensors in the plane and based on these observations they perform some local computations. This project addresses the problem of topological and cooperative navigation of robots in such complex systems.

PACTOL - (2009–2011)

Members:

LIP6 (NPA, Regal), CNAM

Funding:

Ile de France Region

Objectives:

The scope of PACTOL is to propose verification tools for self-stabilizing distributed algorithms.